Roxy Manning

Roxy Manning

CNVC Certified Trainer from San Francisco, California, USA

Roxy’s life experience as an Afro-Caribbean immigrant combined with her academic training and professional work as a licensed clinical psychologist and CNVC Certified Trainer have cultivated a deep passion in her for work that supports social change, whether that’s with individuals, couples, or institutions.

As a facilitator, she’s thrilled by the process of holding opposing voices and ushering groups from discord towards values-driven solutions that work for everyone. Her own inner work coupled with her professional experience has grown her capacity to meet people with varying levels of education, disparate life experiences, and the most intense feelings in ways that help them feel heard, respected, supported and loved. She has worked with individuals and groups committed to social justice in Sri Lanka, Japan, The Netherlands, and Thailand. Roxy also consulted with businesses, nonprofits, and academic institutions and government organizations around the U.S., wanting to move towards equitable and diverse hiring practices and workplace cultures.

Roxy brought Nonviolent Communication into her psychotherapy practice in 2003, and has been offering classes and workshops in NVC since 2005. She served as the Executive Director of BayNVC from 2014-2017, was a trainer for BayNVC’s NVC Leadership Program from 2008-2017, and has been a trainer for the Nonviolent Leadership for Social Justice Retreat since she co-founded it in 2007. She served as an elected member of the Center for Nonviolent Communication’s Implementation Council from 2017 – 2018, where she collaborated with other experienced NVC practitioners tasked with reinventing CNVC’s communication, and moving the organization’s decision-making structures toward effective democratization and connection to the NVC community worldwide.   As a psychologist, Roxy maintains a private therapy practice, and works with the City and County of San Francisco’s Disability Evaluation and Consultation Unit, serving the homeless and disenfranchised mentally ill population.

Read some of Roxy’s articles on her website here: http://www.roxannemanning.com/musings/

Website: BayNVC

When we're on the receiving end of pain-stimulating assumptions, a microaggression, or prejudice --when we're reactive and resultingly have self doubt, guilt or shame in ourselves-- is it possible to be intensely authentic while holding care for everyone in the situation? Can we effectively do this even as a third party witnesses to these things?
There are times when someone judges us, or meets us with prejudice, and its easier for us to respond by hating them, or judging ourselves as not good enough. How can we love another person instead without excusing their actions? Roxy tells us her story with wonderment, grief and mourning.
What can we do when someone tells us we're contributing to a pattern we're genuinely not seeing (nor experiencing)? What makes these patterns visible to some people but not others? This article addresses these things by talking about what to factor in when receiving feedback; handling feedback; responding relationally; paying attention to social location; considering impact; plus, broadening our perspective to bring in greater care and awareness.
When we have few external resources (money, time, health connections, etc), we can still empower ourselves and one another.  We can strengthen our internal resources, inspire people to join our cause, build solidarity, and influence others who have external resources to support us and our causes.
Join Roxy Manning for a provocative fishbowl discussion about how privilege and lack of privilege affect people of color.
Do you yearn to step forward in leadership, but know you're holding back? Clinical psychologist, organizational consultant, and speaker, Roxy Manning, PhD, shows us that more than external factors, its our internal beliefs and fears that provide the main barrier to moving forward.  She does this by taking us through three myths of leadership, and weaves in anecdotes to illustrate how tapping our unique (often lesser recognized) qualities, can be the way forward we've been seeking. Learn ways to move forward, even if at first it appears that (1.) others can "do it better", (2.) you need to be more prepared, or even if (3.) the material you're conveying isn't so original (and has been used many times).
Responding to a Painful Comment: How do you carry on a conversation when someone’s comment has had an impact on you? And what happens when two intentions clash because of different perspectives? Here’s Roxy’s powerful, common sense approach.
When you reach “across the aisle” to others who hold differing levels of power, privilege, or rank — or who come from vastly different cultures — you may feel as though you’re about to step into a minefield, where even your best attempt could inadvertently trigger an explosion. Join Roxy and change it up! You’ll learn practices that can help you safely navigate difficult or confusing situations, and enjoy plenty of space for practice time, too.
How do you bring empathy and authenticity to uncomfortable work situations when there are so many layers of difference – especially if your primary reason for working is to feed your family and pay your bills? Listen in as Roxy opens participants' eyes to some of the many layers of difference we all deal with on a daily basis.
Listen to Roxy Manning explore the barriers to speaking authentically as powerful voices for change, and practice these needed conversations about the ongoing violence in the streets of America.
Connection Central: Nonviolent Communication Articles (NVC)
NVC Booksdance floors 300x30