Eric Bowers

Eric Bowers

CNVC Certified Trainer from Saltspring Island, British Columbia, Canada

Eric Bowers is a CNVC Certified Nonviolent Communication (NVC) Trainer with extensive training in Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB) and Attachment Theory. Eric brings together NVC, IPNB and Attachment Theory in his courses, workshops and private sessions. He has a passion for depth work and for supporting single people to learn and heal from past relationships and prepare for thriving relationships. Prior to his work as an NVC Trainer, Eric worked as a Children-Who Witness-Abuse Counselor and an expedition river guide and white water kayaker in British Columbia, the Yukon and Alaska.

"Your skilled, yet so very personal and vulnerable mentoring of NVC consciousness so met my need for safety, intimacy, inspiration, learning and celebration of our shared experience of being human...wonderfully, connectedly so! It has been a particular pleasure and privilege to have met you and gotten to know you in this way, and I look forward to all opportunities to take more of your workshops."
—Respectfully, Karin Kilpatrick M.D

Trainer's Website: Road to Compassion
Trainer's Facebook Page: Road to Compassion

In our fast-paced, busy lives it is tempting to practice NVC mostly with the left hemisphere of the brain, thinking through the steps quickly without slowing down to connect more deeply with feelings and needs.  Don't miss an opportunity to integrate the hemispheres of the brain and the valuable information from the neural networks in the heart and gut.
Conflict is a normal and natural part of life. To varying degrees, it happens whenever two or more people consistently spend time together. Resolving conflict effectively and peacefully, in a way in which all parties feel respected and valued, does not feel natural for those of us who grew up with punitive, adversarial, or avoidant approaches to conflict. Eric offers some tips for approaching conflict.
Who does not want to be understood? In Tip #6, Eric shows you how to deepen connection and trust by checking your understanding with the person you are conversing with.
Eric Bowers explains how needs and strategies correlate to different brain hemispheres, and how relaxing into our needs opens us to greater possibilities.
When asking for support from another, you are most likely to enjoy receiving that support when the person giving support is giving from the heart—from a place of joy or delight. Inviting them to say "no" is a way of encouraging an authentic response, a response you can trust more fully.
Eric explains how we can often avoid regret by getting empathy before making important decisions.
Learn when to use the two types of requests in the practice of Nonviolent Communication: Action Requests and Connection Requests. Both are important when working through conflict or difficult situations and for building connection.
Do you ever think you have the perfect answer for someone who is struggling? Eric offers a tip on how to approach situations like this.
Using his own life experience, Eric explores why we need support from others, what support might look like, and what blocks us from asking for support for our relationships.
The human needs that we all share are the foundation of the Nonviolent Communication (NVC) process because it is in connecting to needs that we find inner freedom, empowerment and compassion.
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Connection Central: Nonviolent Communication Articles (NVC)
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