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Roxy Manning

Roxy Manning

CNVC Certified Trainer from San Francisco, California, USA

Roxy’s life experience as an Afro-Caribbean immigrant combined with her academic training and professional work as a licensed clinical psychologist and CNVC Certified Trainer have cultivated a deep passion in her for work that supports social change, whether that’s with individuals, couples, or institutions.

As a facilitator, she’s thrilled by the process of holding opposing voices and ushering groups from discord towards values-driven solutions that work for everyone. Her own inner work coupled with her professional experience has grown her capacity to meet people with varying levels of education, disparate life experiences, and the most intense feelings in ways that help them feel heard, respected, supported and loved. She has worked with individuals and groups committed to social justice in Sri Lanka, Japan, The Netherlands, and Thailand. Roxy also consulted with businesses, nonprofits, and academic institutions and government organizations around the U.S., wanting to move towards equitable and diverse hiring practices and workplace cultures.

Roxy brought Nonviolent Communication into her psychotherapy practice in 2003, and has been offering classes and workshops in NVC since 2005. She served as the Executive Director of BayNVC from 2014-2017, was a trainer for BayNVC’s NVC Leadership Program from 2008-2017, and has been a trainer for the Nonviolent Leadership for Social Justice Retreat since she co-founded it in 2007. She served as an elected member of the Center for Nonviolent Communication’s Implementation Council from 2017 – 2018, where she collaborated with other experienced NVC practitioners tasked with reinventing CNVC’s communication, and moving the organization’s decision-making structures toward effective democratization and connection to the NVC community worldwide.   As a psychologist, Roxy maintains a private therapy practice, and works with the City and County of San Francisco’s Disability Evaluation and Consultation Unit, serving the homeless and disenfranchised mentally ill population.

Read some of Roxy’s articles on her website here: www.roxannemanning.com

For many people, attempting to connect with others across differences can feel akin to walking through a minefield. In this course recording Roxy explores a variety of concepts and practices that can help you navigate situations that might be confusing, challenging, or even shocking. And she'll be delving into key differentiations, such as equity and equality. This recording will offer a renewed sense of clarity around a number of theories that may help explain specifically why the areas of power, advantage, and rank tend to be so difficult to work with.

In treating everyone the same, we perpetuate inequities. If we want NVC consciousness to spread globally, it's crucial to acknowledge how various demographics are have varying capacities, and are differentially perceived, treated and impacted. Modifying our NVC teachings can increase equity and reduce the frequent judgement, disbelief, denial, insistence, non-resonance and re-marginalization that so many experience in NVC circles.

The notion of "micro-aggressions" may be levied by those in the dominant class - for example white folks may talk about receiving micro-aggressions when a (legitimately) angry BIPOC references them as "white". This shuts down the conversation and feeds a myth that everyone's pain about race is equal. It doesn't foster dialogue that moves us towards a more equitable, compassionate world. Read on for more about the complexity.

During this segment, Roxy answers questions about reverse racism; Black lives matter vs all lives matter; what it means when a person of color calls you a racist; how to address seeing color without being color blind; and defines micro-aggressions.

Many believe it's only a true NVC request when we can ask for what we need without urgency or insistence. But what if we're the target of oppression and hate in a world with systemic inequality? Is it still nonviolence to abdicate power by allowing the person enacting harm to be the one to decide whether harm continues? The intensity of the need, degree of harm, and how chronically unmet the need is, are factors to guide us for when to apply force and demand within NVC. We can be attached to outcome, without being attached to strategy.

  • Speak honestly and authentically
  • Share your experiences and really be heard
  • Effectively manage self-doubt and overwhelm to stay present
  • Start creating a more equitable world

Listen in as Roxy explains how NVC approaches systemic change: through the protective use of force, the ability to self connect and connect to others, requests vs. demands, and understanding needs that are motivating behaviors. 

For many people, attempting to connect with others across differences can feel akin to walking through a minefield. With humility, tenderness, and courage, Roxy challenges your perspectives and encourages you to open your heart and mind. Roxy uses concrete examples and visual tools to illustrate complex concepts.

The first session of this course is available for all to listen to and enjoy.

When conflict or criticism occurs, we can notice two layers of meaning to create connection: the content and the needs the speaker is holding. When we are able to recognize this --and ideally engage open-heartedly, with curiosity, make clear requests, imagining what they want, no matter how their expression was framed -- we have more opportunity to support the longevity of our relationships, and to decrease our loneliness when together.

The existing unequal risks and impacts people of certain race, class and identities face in society is magnified in these strenuous times -- especially with things such as illness, financial well being, discrimination, attacks, and death. As responsive NVC practitioners we can stand in solidarity with those who are differentially impacted. Read on for this, and additional ways to spot common pitfalls of doing so.

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